Jae Gruenke – The Wise Woman of Running Form

There are lots of claims from various sources that you can change your running form and run faster and injury free. Most approaches are just someone’s opinion with little to no evidence or science behind the claims. Franchises and businesses have been built upon these shaky claims and fueled by peoples insatiable quest for the holy grail of running faster injury free.

Unfortunately, what science does show is that thinking about and focusing on your running form and making changes results in higher costs in energy expenditure compared to just relaxing and running the way that feels natural for you. Running is a natural movement best developed from experience and sensation. Thinking, analyzing and trying to run a certain way or focusing on how to move or forcing yourself to move a certain way while you are running typically makes things worse.

In my experience, you are better off saving your time and money by avoiding any canned advertised approaches to running form or technique. If you can’t resist the temptation of working on your running form, then the only running form expert that I would recommend is Jae Gruenke who hosts The Balanced Runner. Her analysis and approach to running technique and running form is more experiential and sensorial combined with a logical analysis of whole body movement. I like her attitude that You don’t Need a Method.  I’ve found her analysis of the various running styles of the world’s greatest marathon runners enlightening and entertaining.

Check it out these examples:

Nike Sub 2: Kipchoge Tadese Desisa

Chicago 2017: Rupp Kirui Dibaba Hasay

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About Bridger Ridge Run

The Bridger Ridge Run blog is an information portal for all those seeking to learn more about the Bridger Ridge Run event held every second Saturday of August in Bozeman Montana. This blog contains notifications about important registration dates and deadlines, history of the event, training advice and other stories and entertaining tidbits of information about the Bridger Ridge Run.
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